Guest Speaker: 10 takeaways on podcasting from journalist Abigail Edge

On January 6th, our Top Audio Storytelling class heard from Abigail Edge, a British journalist now based in Colorado about changes in the podcasting market and her own experience of producing a podcast.

Abigail is currently working with Shorthand, an immersive storytelling startup; and she also runs Hacks/Hackers Colorado.

Prior to this, she was most recently the Technology Editor for journalism.co.uk — where she also helped produce their weekly podcast, alternating production with two other colleagues (meaning she produced one edition every three weeks).

Disclaimer: Abigail also wrote for TheMediaBriefing whilst I was editing this publication during Summer 2015, which included this excellent piece on the economics of podcasting.

Here are 10 takeaways from our discussion with her:

1. The cost to entry for podcasting has never been so low.

2. And consumption has never been so high, with 5m downloads for Serial, 1 billion podcast downloads on iTunes in 2014.

3. Millennials are a key podcast audience, often listening to six a week.

4. If you haven’t got access to studio, then DIY versions can be just as good. Abigail used to record her journalism.co.uk podcasts onto her iPhone, with her head inside a cardboard box to damped the sound. This was done in a communal kitchen enjoyed by different companies in the same building as her employer!

5. If you haven’t got a box or a communal kitchen, putting a duvet over your head will do!

Image via Tumblr

 

6. Recommended apps/kit: voice memo for iPhone, Skype call recorder,Adobe Audition, Audacity®TapeACall, a Rode smartLav+ Lavalier Microphone.

7. Recommended listening: Serial, This American Life, Guardian Tech podcast and the output of Scroobius Pip.

8. Involve your audience: engage them beforehand, by asking for topics to cover, questions to ask interviewees etc. Tease podcasts by including pictures from recordings, quotes on Twitter or Facebook etc.

9. Platforms for publication:Soundcloud’s analytics are arguably easier to use than iTunes. But they’re both good starting points.

10: Explore further: Keep an eye on the Panopoly Podcast Network from Slate and Sticher.

Our thanks to Abigail (@abigailedge) for her thoughts and time.

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